Facts about Kidney Donation

The lifetime risk of moderate kidney disease in Americans is 59.1 percent, which translates into 135.8 million people currently alive who will eventually develop moderate kidney disease. For moderate–severe kidney disease, the risk was 33.6 percent, and for severe (stage 4) kidney disease, the lifetime risk was 11.5 percent. Finally, end–stage kidney disease requiring dialysis or kidney transplantation, has a lifetime risk of 3.6 percent which is dramatically higher among African–Americans at 8 percent.

  • 60% of Americans will Develop Kidney Disease in Their Lifetime*
  • 59.1% – 35.8 Million Americans will Develop Moderate Kidney Disease
  • 33.6% – Moderate to severe
  • 11.5% – Stage 4
  • 3.6% – End-stage renal disease

African Americans, Hispanics, and Native Americans are all disproportionately more likely to need a transplant but less likely to be referred to a transplant center. In fact, tens of thousands of patients medically suitable for transplants never make it to the waiting list. The most recent data show that once on the list, African Americans wait 40 percent longer to receive a kidney than whites do, and Hispanic candidates wait 50 percent longer.

Kidney Disease is the ninth leading cause of death in the United States.

More than 600,000 Americans suffer from End Stage Renal Disease (ESRD).

The primary medical response to this is Dialysis, which, while can offer a modest extension of life, does not offer quality of life.

Transplantation is medically acknowledged to be the preferred treatment, offering longer lifespans, fewer complications and a higher quality of life, at much lower expense.

Currently, there are not enough kidneys available for transplant, and the multi-faceted debate on the ethics of living kidney transplant has become a barrier to realistic and appropriate solutions: solutions that are very possible and of which tens of thousands of needy people are never made aware.

Deceased kidney donation efforts have been successful, but have failed to keep pace with the rate of increase in cases of kidney disease.
Over 100,000 people are added to the National Kidney Transplant Waiting list each year.

African Americans, Hispanics, and Native Americans are all disproportionately more likely to need a transplant but less likely to be referred to a transplant center. In fact, tens of thousands of patients medically suitable for transplants never make it to the waiting list. The most recent data show that once on the list, African Americans wait 40 percent longer to receive a kidney than whites do, and Hispanic candidates wait 50 percent longer.